Subscribe to our mailing list to get news, specials and updates:     Name: Email:

Chorale Prelude on "All people that on earth do dwell" (Old Hundredth)

165 views | Find this title on Sheet Music Plus
Login to recommend piece!


Comments (8)

Comment on this music


Login/Register to post a comment.

Uploaded by: Agnus_Dei (04/08/17)
Composer: Best, William Thomas
Sample Producer: Lavender Audio
Sample Set: The Armley Schulze
Software: Hauptwerk
Genre: Romantic
Description:
William Thomas Best (13 August 1826 — 10 May 1897) studied at Carlisle Cathedral under John Norman and Abraham Young. Organist of the Pembroke Road Chapel, Liverpool, 1840-55; the Church for the Blind, Liverpool, 1847; the Royal Panopticon, Leicester Square, London, 1853-54; Lincoln’s Inn Chapel, 1854; St. Martin’s-in-the-Fields, Trafalgar Square, London, 1855; St. George’s Hall, Liverpool, 1855-94; Wallasey Parish Church, Birkenhead, 1860-63; Holy Trinity, Liverpool, 1863; West Derby Parish Church, 1879. Engaged in 1871 to give recitals at the Royal Albert Hall (stayed for only a short time). Solo Organist at the Handel festival at the Crystal Palace. Opened the organ in Sydney Town Hall, 1890. Was one of the greatest English Organists of his time. Received a Civil List pension of £100 per annum. Composed church services, anthems, organ pieces, &c. b. Carlisle, England, Aug. 13th, 1826; d. Liverpool, May 10th, 1897 (buried in Childwell Churchyard).

Best was certainly the most famous British organist of the time, and was proclaimed by none other than Franz Liszt to be THE greatest virtuoso on ANY instrument!

He is said to have had a repertoire (ready to play!) of over 10,000 pieces!

This work is the third in the collection of "Twelve Short Preludes on Old English Psalm-Tunes. This famous melody for words for Psalm 100 was written by the French musician, Louis Bourgeois (c. 1510-1559).
Best gives the tune as being from 1550.

In this performance, the "full Swell without reeds' is for the accompaniment, while the tune appear in the tenor, played upon the Great diapasons and Trompete 8'.

This is not the typically bombastic setting of this tune! Rather, we hear Mendelssohn again, especially in the active pedal part, composed in a cello-like manner.

Despite the fact that these are short pieces, there is a lot of music in a short space of time.

Photos of Best are attached below, as well as the great Willis organ in St. George's Hall, Liverpool.
Performance: Live
Recorded in: Stereo
Playlists:
Options: Sign up today to download piece.
Subscribe to Agnus_Dei's music
See what Agnus_Dei used to make this recording
 
Attachments:
  • Please Log in to download.
  • Please Log in to download.
  • Please Log in to download.
Name: