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Trumpet Voluntary

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Uploaded by: Agnus_Dei (11/20/17)
Composer: Dupuis, Thomas Sanders
Sample Producer: Lavender Audio
Sample Set: Hereford Cathedral Willis Organ
Software: Hauptwerk
Genre: Baroque
Description:
Thomas Sanders Dupuis, Mus. Doc. (1733–1796) was a composer and organist of French extraction, born in London. He succeeded William Boyce at the Chapel Royal, and was regarded as one of the best organists of his day.

His published work includes Nine Voluntaries for the Organ, performed before their Majesties at the Chapel Royal, St. Paul's Cathedral, etc.

He was the third son of John Dupuis, a member of a Huguenot family who is said to have held an appointment at court. Dupuis was born 5 November 1733, and was brought up as a chorister in the Chapel Royal under Bernard Gates and John Travers. On 3 December 1758 he was elected a member of the Royal Society of Musicians.

By 1773 Dupuis was organist of the Charlotte Street Chapel (now St. Peter's Chapel), near Buckingham Palace, and on the death of Boyce he was elected (24 March 1779) organist and composer to the Chapel Royal. On 26 June 1790 Dupuis accumulated the degrees of Mus.Bac. and Mus.Doc. at Oxford. In the same year he originated a sort of musical club, known as the Graduates' Meeting.

Dupuis died at King's Row, Park Lane, 17 July 1796, and was buried in the west cloister of Westminster Abbey on the 24th. A collection of his cathedral music, in 3 vols., was published after his death by his pupil John Spencer. Prefixed to this work is a portrait (which is attached below).

For some reason, ever since my earliest church jobs, I've always played "18th century voluntaries" at Thanksgiving time. I don't know why. There's just something about the "sound" that makes me feel that they are "appropriate," but there's nothing scholarly about the association!

This famous movement problem comes from a longer, "full" voluntary, but I've never seen any movement other than this one.

I've done this in an "inaccurate" way, as I've used the Solo tromba as the "first trumpet," and the Swell trumpet as the "echo."

The score is attached below, as well as the portrait mentioned above.

More "Thanksgiving" music to follow!
Performance: Live
Recorded in: Stereo
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