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Toccata und Fuge d-moll

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Uploaded by: EdoL (05/07/18)
Composer: Eberlin, Johann Ernst
Sample Producer: OrganART Media
Sample Set: 1731 G. Silbermann, Reinhardtsgrimma (SURROUND)
Software: Hauptwerk
Genre: Baroque//Classisism
Description:
Johann Ernst Eberlin (1702 – 1762) was a German composer and organist whose works bridge the baroque and classical eras. He was a prolific composer, chiefly of church organ and choral music.
Marpurg claims he wrote as much and as rapidly as Alessandro Scarlatti and Georg Philipp Telemann, a claim also repeated by Leopold Mozart - though ultimately Eberlin did not live nearly as long as either of those two composers.

Eberlin's first musical training began in 1712 at the Jesuit Gymnasium of St. Salvator in Augsburg. His teachers there were Georg Egger and Balthasar Siberer, who taught him how to play the organ. He began his university education in 1721 at the Benedictine University in Salzburg where he studied law, but from 1723 turned to music.

His first breakthrough was in 1727 when he became the organist for Count Leopold von Firmian (then Archbishop of Salzburg). He reached the peak of his career when he was the organist for Archbishop Andreas Jakob von Dietrichstein. By 1749 he held the posts of Hof- und Domkapellmeister (Court and Cathedral chapel master) simultaneously, an achievement which his successors Michael Haydn, Leopold Mozart, and Mozart himself were not to match.

This nice composition is a good example of his organ works.

The dynamics are not by Eberlin himself: the editor I played the work from added them, but since they are nice I decided not to record the piece again, as the various sound patterns are a good example of what is possible on the Silbermann.

The Toccata is very predictable, but the fugue is a nice and inventive one.
Judge for yourself!

Front/Rear settings: Front:80 and Rear:70
(OAM recommended settings.
Have them in the organ, but copied them wrong in some uploads // Sorry!)
Performance: Live
Recorded in: Stereo
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