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'Tis good, Lord, to be here!

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Uploaded by: Agnus_Dei (08/06/16)
Composer: Lockhart, Charles
Sample Producer: Milan Digital Audio
Sample Set: Salisbury Cathedral Father Willis
Software: Hauptwerk
Genre: Hymn
Description:
Today, August 6th, is the feast of the Transfiguration.

In this important day in the Church's year, s, Jesus and three of his apostles, Peter, James and John, go to a mountain to pray. On the mountain, Jesus begins to shine with bright rays of light. Then the prophets Moses and Elijah appear next to him and he speaks with them. Jesus is then called "Son" by a voice in the sky, assumed to be God the Father, as in the Baptism of Jesus.

In Christian teachings, the Transfiguration is a pivotal moment, and the setting on the mountain is presented as the point where human nature meets God: the meeting place for the temporal and the eternal, with Jesus himself as the connecting point, acting as the bridge between heaven and earth. Moreover, Christians consider the Transfiguration to fulfill an Old Testament messianic prophecy that Elijah would return again after his ascension.

This well-known hymn was composed by Charles Lockhart (1745-1815), who spent his entire life in the London area. He was first organist of the Lock Hospital, and was for some years associated with Martin Madan in the musical arrangements there. Though blind from infancy, Lockhart had a distinct musical gift, and was especially known for training children’s choirs.

The name of the hymn-tune is "Carlisle," and is sung in churches of may denominations.

The text was written by Sir Joseph Armitage Robinson, KCVO, DD (9 January 1858 – 7 May 1933), who was a priest in the Church of England and scholar. He was successively Dean of Westminster (1902–1911) and of Wells (1911–1933).

The text of the hymn is given in the first response, and there is one full verse of introduction. It is done a straight-forward manner, without fuss or fanciness.

Attached are the photo a Byzantine icon showing the Transfiguration, and photos of a painting of J. Armitage Robinson, and his memorial stone in Wells Cathedral.
Performance: Live
Recorded in: Stereo
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